8 Misconceptions About Strong Women


Confident women are amazing, brave, independent, strong and assertive. They know what they want and get it by all means. Before judging confident women, remember these 8 misconceptions about strong girls.

1. They are not sensitive


Many believe confident women are totally selfish and self-centered. In fact, confident women have weak moments too. They can be as sensitive as any other person can be.

2. They don’t like compliments


Any woman – be she strong or weak – loves praises and compliments. Confident women want to be praised and they deserve beautiful words.

3. They know absolutely everything


Yes, confident women are smart and intelligent but they there are something they don’t know about. No matter how hard you try, you can’t know everything. Confident women are not afraid to accept their mistakes. They learn from them and don’t make them twice. Reading is one of their best hobbies but it doesn’t mean they are nerds. They are fun and interesting to hang out with.

4. They’re not afraid of anything


Fear doesn’t choose whom to strike. It strikes everyone. Confident women dread to become weak or broken. When a confident woman faces a challenge or a failure, though, she becomes stronger and her faith helps her move mountains and become more successful.

5. They don’t care about other people’s opinions


There’s a difference between worrying about what others will think or say about you and paying attention to other people’s opinions. Confident women do whatever they want to do because they don’t let others prevent them from being who they are. Girls with weak willpower, on the contrary, let others control their actions.

6. They never get hurt


Strong women get hurt too. They feel pain – they are not cold. They all have kind hearts. Whether it’s someone’s death, a breakup or a discharge, they feel it all. They feel lost, frustrated, and depressed.

7. They can’t love


Even though strong women have trouble expressing their true feelings, they can love. They love animals, people, nature and job. They love life. They deserve to be loved. Instead of moaning and judging, boost your own confidence.

8. They are self absorbed


Just because confident women walk with their heads high and believe in their strength and abilities doesn’t mean they are self-absorbed. Strong women respect others and try to help and inspire them to live a better life.

Advertisements

5 Ways to Infect Others with Motivation


When I talk to managers, one of their most common issues is difficulty in motivating employees. Here are some (research) proven methods for motivating employees, and they also work for motivating yourself.

Positive Effect is Contagious


Be A Motivational Role Model


A good leader would never ask a follower to do more than he or she is willing to do. Set an example of hard work and high levels of activity and many of your workers or team members will follow your lead. Be the first one to tackle a task or a problem, and others will fall in behind you.

Focus on the Shared Mission


Many people lose motivation because they forget about the purpose. A good leader focuses on the mission of the group or organization and gets people committed to that mission. When motivation lags, the leader can remind followers of what the common purpose is and the importance of the work that they are doing.

Set Challenging Goals


 Goal setting is one of the best ways to engage and motivate others. But goal setting is a science and requires careful attention to the process in order to be successful. The acronym is to set SMART goals: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. What that means is that goals should be associated with specific, measurable outcomes. They need to be realistic, neither too high (so that they are unattainable) nor too low (not challenging), they should mean something to the individual and there should be a time-to-completion.

Celebrate Small Wins


Research has suggested that the best way to drive continuous levels of motivation is to allow the person to experience “small wins”—breaking down a large task into smaller, measurable steps and celebrating the attainment of each step or level. This is the strategy that makes on-line games so “addicting”—as you reach each level in Angry Birds or Candy Crush, or get a small win in your game battle or add a piece to your farm, etc., you are motivated to achieve more.

The Four Types of Sleep Schedules


A new study suggests that some people are neither “owls” nor “larks”. Erwin Schrödinger, the Nobel-prize-winning Austrian physicist, was able to make major contributions to the fields of quantum mechanics, general relativity, and color theory during his lifetime. There was only one caveat: He was not able to make those contributions … in the morning.


“He couldn’t work in the mornings at all,” his wife, AnneMarie, said in an interview. “The [Max] Planck lectures—as you know, it was 30 or 40 years ago that Planck was in Berlin—were given in the morning from nine to ten. When he got this very, very honorable call from Berlin, he wrote first thing and said, ‘I’m very sorry, but I can’t keep the lecture hours because I can’t work in the morning.’ … They understood, and changed it to the afternoon—two lectures, one after the other—on two days.”


Scientists would later classify people like Schrödinger as “owls”—people who prefer to wake up late and are more alert in the evenings. It’s one of two basic chronotypes, or preferred sleep schedules. The other is “larks,” or crazy people those who prefer early mornings.

But now, scientists in Russia are proposing that there are actually four chronotypes: In addition to early and late risers, they say, there are also people who feel energetic in both the mornings and evenings, as well as people who feel lethargic all day.


For a study forthcoming in the journal Personality and Individual Differences, biologist Arcady Putilov and his colleagues at the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences asked 130 people to stay awake for 24 hours. The subjects filled out questionnaires about how awake they felt, their sleep patterns, and how well they had functioned during the previous week.

The results showed that among them were 29 larks, who showed higher energy levels at 9 a.m. than at 9 p.m., and 44 owls, for whom the opposite was true. The owls also went to bed about two hours later, on average, than the larks. But the rest of the group fell into neither of these patterns.


There was a “high energetic” group of 25 people who reported feeling relatively sprightly in both the morning and evening; and a “lethargic” group of 32 others, who described feeling relatively dozy in both the morning and evening.

Both the lethargic and energetic participants went to bed and woke up somewhere between the owl and lark times. The energetic people slept about a half-hour less overall than the other three groups, netting about 7.5 hours of sleep each night.

So next time, rather than complain to your co-workers that you’re “always tired,” just let them know that you’re part of a newly discovered chronotype that is, in essence, all out of awakes to give.